CinemAddicts Podcast Reviews Top Notch Nicolas Cage Flick ‘Looking Glass’

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Seen last month in the first rate suburban nightmare Mom and Dad, Nicolas Cage continues his run of excellent work with Looking Glass. Directed by River’s Edge filmmaker Tim Hunter, the feature centers on Ray and Maggie (Nicolas Cage, Robin Tunney) a dysfunctional couple who buy a motel that’s housed in a mysterious, and possibly dangerous, small town.

The motel has a crawlspace that connects all of the rooms in the motel, and thanks to double sided mirrors Ray is able to explore his voyeuristic tendencies. Ray’s thrills are short-lived after a murder takes place on the property, and a sheriff (Marc Blucas) believes Ray might be the number one suspect!

Cage is at his unhinged best with Looking Glass, and Tunney (just like Blair in Mom and Dad) proves she’s more than up to the task to verbally spar with the actor (their scenes together are electric). Hunter infused Looking Glass with a graphic comic book, B-movie style aesthetic, and that pulpy flavor absolutely works with Looking Glass. Coming out February 16 in theaters, On Demand, and Digital HD, Looking Glass is a must see for Cage fans and, more importantly, devotees to well executed, if not lurid, thrillers.

Other films discussed on CinemAddicts is the Rebecca Hall/Dan Stevens relationship drama Permission and the punk rock feature Bomb City. Both open February 9. Take a listen below to the latest episode of CinemAddicts!

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Posted by: Greg Srisavasdi

‘Beauty And The Beast’ Receives Exclusive One Week Engagement

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With awards season in full bloom, Disney is making sure critics don’t forget Beauty and the Beast. The feature, headlined by Emma Watson and Dan Stevens, will have a one week exclusive engagement in Los Angeles (AMC Century City) and New York (AMC Empire 25) starting Friday, December 1.

The feature, directed by Bill Condon and based on the 1991 animated classic, was this year’s top grossing movie with a domestic gross of over $504 million (it’s made over $1 billion worldwide).The score was composed by Alan Menken and Howard Ashman (with additional songs by Menken and Tim Rice).

Click on the media bar below to hear Emma Watson talk about what makes Belle a special individual:

Were you a fan of the live action version of Beauty and the Beast? Feel free to comment below!

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Posted by: Greg Srisavasdi

‘The Ticket’ With Dan Stevens Hits Blu-Ray In June

theticket7Dan Stevens has received his share of attention thanks to the box office hit Beauty and the Beast and critically acclaimed FX series Legion. He also gives a great performance in The Ticket, a drama which hits Blu-ray and DVD June 6th via Shout! Factory.

After miraculously regaining his vision, James (Stevens) wants to makeover his current life by climbing up the corporate ladder and buying a new home. James’ ravenous pursuit of success leads to complications with his loving wife (Malin Akerman) and best friend (and co-worker) Bob (Oliver Platt). Halt and Catch Fire’s Kerry Bishe is James’ co-worker Jessica, a woman who’s drawn to James’ newly ambitious attitude.

The Ticket is a subtly told drama that, thanks to its rich and nuanced performances, never devolves into a preachy look at the loss of a man’s faith. Director Ido Fluk’s meticulous approach to James’ journey, beautifully rendered in the film’s closing moments, is also another reason to check this movie out.

The Blu-ray and DVD versions comes with audio commentary from Fluk and writer Sharon Mashihi and the original theatrical trailer. The Ticket can be ordered by visiting ShoutFactory.com.

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Posted by: Greg Srisavasdi

Review: Dan Stevens And Malin Akerman Shine In Nuanced Drama ‘The Ticket’

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Director/writer Ido Fluk begins The Ticket in audacious fashion, as we see life through the eyes of James (Dan Stevens), a blind man who, as much as we can glean in several minutes, is a rather happy man. Fluk pulls us in immediately into James’ world through the use of audio and near pitch darkness, but even without any images to set the table, we have a pretty clear picture of why James is completely fine without his sight.

James’ wife Sam (Malin Akerman) and son Jonah (Skylar Gaertner) are as loving and supportive as can be, so when James regains his sight one blessed morning, the proverbial happy ending seems just around the corner. But getting what one’s heart desires is a tricky thing, and James immediately aims for a higher station in life. Quickly moving up the ladder in his company with an exacting strategy to scoop up homes from financially strapped owners, James’ business tactics are ruthless. Ultimately his ascent to the top may lead to adultery, as he unscrupulously sets his sights on a once unattainable co-worker (Kerry Bishé).

Though the plotline of regaining one’s sight could have led The Ticket into fantastical and even maudlin territory, Fluk keeps everything on an even keel. One prime example of Fluk’s approach occurs during a lunch scene between James and his best friend (and co-worker) Bob (Oliver Platt). Both Stevens and Platt could have gone to the mat with a showy, scenery chewing scene (at this point in the movie, the friends are brimming with contempt for on another). Instead, Fluk keeps everything grounded in reality, giving us a well drawn picture of a life that’s slowly coming apart at the seams.

Stevens is a charismatic chameleon who has years of leading men roles ahead of him, and Platt is one of cinema’s more arresting character actors (for proof, check out his scene stealing turn in Cut Bank). It’s a given both of them would knock their respective roles out of the park, but surprisingly it’s Malin Akerman’s heartbreaking and  performance that resonates far after the credits roll. Though Sam’s intentions for James are borne out of love, her decision to shield him from certain problems has dire consequences.

Fluk’s choice of closing his film with a somewhat ambiguous ending is also a bold choice, as he gives viewers the chance to interpret if James’ fall leads to redemption. If one were to judge the film on the opening and final moments, The Ticket would succeed on sheer narrative audacity. Thankfully, everything in between is also worth the price of admission, and if you’re in the mood for an evocative and intimate look at a man come undone, The Ticket should do the trick.

The Ticket opens in select cities Friday, April 7 with a national rollout to follow.

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Posted by: Greg Srisavasdi


Dan Stevens Gets Physical For ‘Beauty and the Beast’ Waltz

Beauty and the BeastThough Emma Watson’s singing is front and center behind Beauty and the Beast, Dan Stevens (Downton Abbey) had an equally challenging journey for his respective role as the beast. Describing his outfit as a “muscle suit with stilts,” Stevens had created a back story in which the cursed prince was a dancer.

A big part of Stevens’ performance also included capturing the ambitious waltz that’s featured in the film. Taking on an iconic moment in the film required a mutual level of trust with Watson. “Getting to know Emma, first and foremost on the dance floor, I think it’s a great way, I think it’s a great way to get to know your co-star,” said Stevens. “And I’m going to try and do it with every movie I’m in now whether there’s a waltz in the movie or not.”

Click on the media bar to hear Stevens elaborate the waltz sequence in Beauty and the Beast:

Beauty and the Beast, directed by Bill Condon, is now playing nationwide.

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Posted by: Greg Srisavasdi