CinemAddicts Podcast Covers ‘Glass’ And Choose Your Own Adventure Driven ‘Bandersnatch’

Some of the best comic book films don’t have to originate from Marvel or DC. Director/writer M. Night Shyamalan’s Unbreakable and Split, while paying homage to the artistic form, have also carved out their own creative territory. Glass, a continuation of this immersive universe, is our most highly anticipated film in January. Having James McAvoy, Bruce Willis and Samuel L. Jackson team up with Sarah Paulson should be a thing of beauty, and even though January is a month where most of the films absolutely are forgettable, Glass may rise above the fray.

Other films covered on this month’s episode of CinemAddicts include the choose your own adventure inspired Bandersnatch and State Like Sleep, a thriller headlined by Katherine Waterston which co-stars Michael Shannon and Luke Evans.

What films are you excited to see this month? Feel free to comment below!

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Posted by: Greg Srisavasdi

Kevin Costner Discusses The “Difficult” Journey Of Shooting ‘Waterworld’

The 1995 feature Waterworld was maligned by critics and journalists even before it came out. Whether it was reports of a creative rift with director Kevin Reynolds (Costner eventually took over the reigns) or its escalating budget, the movie was doomed from the start.

Costner has always been a frank and insightful interviewee, and credit goes to him for sitting down with us and fellow media members at the Waterworld press junket back in 1995.

During the interview, Costner talked about the reports the film’s budget. “I’m a pretty fiscally oriented person,” said Costner. “I’ve made movies. I’ve financed movies with my own money. The notion of throwing around money, I don’t want to go into where it goes, that’s not an (modus operandi) for me. I’ve had to wear that yolk to of where the money went. The decisions that I make are always fiscally oriented and story oriented.?

Click on the media bar to hear Costner explain why Waterworld was a “difficult” film to make:

To hear more interviews from the Waterworld press junket, check out Matt and Greg Used to Interview Movie Stars., a podcast I co-host with Matt Levitz.

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Posted by: Greg Srisavasdi

CinemAddicts Podcast Reviews Acclaimed Flicks ‘Cold War’ And ‘Roma’

On the latest episode of CinemAddicts we cover two films that definitely will be remembered come awards time. Both Roma and Cold War come straight from the heart, as the directors used inspiration from their own lives to helm their respective features. The relationship of his parents inspired Pawel Pawlikowski (Ida) pen and direct Cold War, the story of two lovers (Joanna Kulig, Tomasz Kot) who spend years attempting to solidify their relationship. Alfonso Cuaron’s Roma centers on a maid named Cleo (Yalitza Aparicio) and her life in Mexico City. The project, which was also penned by Cuaron, is inspired by his own childhood and it’s his most personal project to date.

 Take a listen to our review of both films in the episode below!

Cold War opens in select theaters on December 21, with Roma landing a December 14 premiere on Netflix.

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Posted by: Greg Srisavasdi

‘CinemAddicts’ Podcast Reviews Nicolas Cage Thriller ‘Mandy’ And ‘Hal’ Documentary

Nicolas Cage as Red in the action, thriller film “MANDY”an RLJE Films release. Photo courtesy of RLJE Films

The latest installment of CinemAddicts is a good one, as we spotlight the Nicolas Cage feature Mandy. Set in 1983, the tale centers on Red Miller (Cage), an average Joe who lives out in the woods with his wife Mandy (Andrea Riseborough). When a cult leader (Linus Roache) and his minions descend upon this loving couple, Red’s life is immediately torn apart, leading to a blood-soaked journey of vengeance.

Directed by Panos Cosmatos, Mandy is a surreal, violent, and ultimately hypnotic story that offers up one of Cage’s best performances (it’s right up there with Adaptation and Joe). The feature hits select theaters on Friday.

We also offer up our take on Hal, a first rate documentary centering on the life of filmmaker Hal Ashby (The Last Detail, Being There). Anderson Cowan and I covered Ashby’s classic film Harold and Maude several weeks ago on Spoiled Cinema, and Ashby’s work is definitely dear to our hearts. Hal which was released last week in New York, hits Los Angeles theaters on Friday. Check out this month’s installment of CinemAddicts below!

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Posted by: Greg Srisavasdi

CinemAddicts Podcast Reviews ‘Never Goin’ Back’ And ‘A Prayer Before Dawn’

There are a ton of movie releases this August, and a few selections that may go under the radar are definitely worth checking out. Now playing in select theaters, Never Goin’ Back centers on two Texas based waitresses (Camila Morrone, Maia Mitchell) who are planning a vacation in Galveston. Their goal to work double shifts to make their money before the trip are thwarted by unforeseen circumstances and their irresponsible tomfoolery. Directed and written by Augustine Frizzell (whose narrative was inspired by her own misspent youth), Never Goin’ Back is a raunchy comedy that has its heart in the right place (even as it deliciously crosses the line of good taste).

Coming out August 10, A Prayer Before Dawn is the true story of Billy Moore (Joe Cole, in a riveting performance), a drug addicted boxer who attempts to fight his way out of Thai prison through his chosen craft. The flick, which has very little exposition, is as intense as they come, and the boxing scenes are absolutely riveting. Not one of its 116 minutes is wasted, and the picture had me on the edge of my seat from the get go. 

Both movies are profiled on the latest episode of CinemAddicts. Take a listen and feel free to comment below!

 

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Posted by: Greg Srisavasdi

CinemAddicts Podcast Reviews ‘Ant-Man And The Wasp’ And ‘Damsel’

Ant-Man and the Wasp and the revisionist Western Damsel are among the films that are discussed on the latest episode of CinemAddicts. If you were a fan of the first feature, Ant-Man and the Wasp doesn’t disappoint and is actually an improvement over the original. Be sure to stay for the end credits as it’s one of the most memorable closing sequences in Marvel history.

Robert Pattinson’s streak of excellent work continues with Damsel, a feature that, if you’ve seen the trailer, seems like a rollicking, quirky flick. Although there are some humorous moments in the feature, Damsel also has its share of dark and evocative moments, and it’s one of this year’s best films. Mia Wasikowska, if she gets a strong push from the heads at Magnolia Pictures, should be in the running from awards consideration (along with Pattinson).

Also covered in this podcast is co-host Anderson Cowan’s discussion of his feature directing debut Groupers and a few of my thoughts on the upcoming Keanu Reeves flick Siberia (opening July 13). Click on the media bar below our CinemAddicts discussion of July’s top releases:

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Posted by: Greg Srisavasdi