Charlize Theron And Seth Rogen Take A “Long Shot” Approach To Chemistry

Long Shot centers on Fred (Seth Rogen), an average Joe who may have a “shot” at romancing his childhood crush Charlotte (Charlize Theron). Hired to be her speechwriter as she eyes the presidency, Fred must balance a possible romance while ensuring he doesn’t get Charlotte in hot water.

“You can fake it,” said Rogen about generating chemistry with his co-stars. “It is highly fakeable. We do like each other but I’ve had good chemistry with people I don’t like very much. It’s a bonus that we also do like each other (laughs).”

Click on the media bar to hear Rogen and Theron talk about what makes Long Shot the perfect summer movie:

Long Shot, co-starring Alexander Skarsgård and Bob Odenkirk, hits theaters May 3.

Find Us On Facebook: Hollywood Outbreak
Follow Us On Twitter: @Hollyoutbreak
Posted by: Greg Srisavasdi

Romantic Comedy ‘The Browsing Effect’ Takes A Swipe At Online Dating

Years ago online dating was a taboo, but that was a sentiment probably reserved for the AOL generation. With dating apps like Tinder and Bumble, not to mention the inevitable social media saturation, meeting a person online is the norm. The Browsing Effect takes a look at a group of friends who take advantage of dating in the digital age. With so many options, however, is finding true love even harder?

Josh Margolin is Ben, a guy who’s still in pain over his ex-girlfriend Rachel (Nikki SooHoo). His latest girlfriend Gabriela (Gabriela Lopez) seems to good to be true, and Ben still wonders if he can ever achieve romantic happiness. 

“(The Browsing Effect) tackles a pretty wide array of experiences,” said Margolin. “It’s an ensemble movie where you follow a handful of different stories and come up with an array of different characters that are having unique experiences with online dating. It doesn’t get hung up on the technical, nitty gritty of it all, as much as it hones in on the emotional experience of online dating. The apps might change and the interfaces may evolve, but the emotional reactions to it are universal.”

Margolin’s comedic flair was one of my favorite aspects of The Browsing Effect, and during the interview I asked about his own approach to comedy. Margolin is also an editor and screenwriter (upcoming film Deep Murder), and he discussed his “multi-pronged” approach to filmmaking:

The Browsing Effect is now available On Demand and Digital.

Find Us On Facebook: Hollywood Outbreak
Follow Us On Twitter: @Hollyoutbreak
Posted by: Greg Srisavasdi

Retta Reflects On Early Television Passions And “Healthy” Approach to Comedy

With Parks and Recreation and now Good Girls as part of her resume, Retta has carved out a highly successful acting career. Retta carved her teeth in show business as a stand-up comedian, but her childhood dreams centered on making a mark in the television genre. 

“I started stand-up to be an actor on a TV show,” said Retta. “My TV was my roommate right out of college and I particularly loved sitcoms. I noticed that a lot of sitcoms had leads who were stand-ups. I thought that was the norm. You do stand-up, you get seen, you get a show. I didn’t think it was going to be that easy but if that was the route that worked for so many, as far as I could see it, I was going to do it.”

Click on the media bar to hear Retta discuss her “healthy” approach to comedy:

Good Girls, co-starring Christina Hendricks, airs Sundays on NBC (10 pm et/pt).

Find Us On Facebook: Hollywood Outbreak
Follow Us On Twitter: @Hollyoutbreak
Posted by: Greg Srisavasdi

William Dickerson Takes Personal And “No Alternative” Approach To Filmmaking

No Alternative, directed and co-written by William Dickerson, centers on Thomas (Conor Proft) and Bridget (Michaela Cavazos), siblings who use music for different purposes. Influenced by grunge rock and affected by Kurt Cobain’s death, Thomas wants his outfit to be more than just another garage band. Bridget’s music discovery is much more recent, as she discovers hip hop may be a great way for self-expression.

Based on his 2012 novel, No Alternative is also inspired by his late sister.  “A lot of it comes from my own life,” said Dickerson. “My sister Briana, she suffered from borderline personality disorder and she used the character of Bri Da B, this hardcore gangster rapper to kinda channel her emotions and get outside of her won turbulent mind. I always thought that would make a great character for a movie. But this movie is not just about this preppy white girl who becomes this gangsta rapper – that could end up being a broad comedy. I wanted there to be pathos in it and show how my sister was suffering and how she dealt with it. Mental illness and the stigma behind that is a big reason why I made the film.”

Click on the media bar to hear William Dickerson talk about why hip hop and grunge are a big aspect of this 1990s set feature.

No Alternative, co-starring Harry Hamlin and Kathryn Erbe, is now out on Blu-ray, DVD, and On Demand.

Find Us On Facebook: Hollywood Outbreak
Follow Us On Twitter: @Hollyoutbreak
Posted by: Greg Srisavasdi

Hugh Jackman Heads To Shangri-La With “Unbelievable” Journey Of ‘Missing Link’

As evidenced with Kubo and the Two Strings and Coraline, Laika Studios has a knack for creating immersive and first rate stories. Missing Link, which features Hugh Jackman as the voice of explorer Sir Lionel Frost, aims to continue that tradition.

The plot centers on Sandy (Zach Galifianakis), better own to folks as Bigfoot. Instead of being a malevolent creature, Sandy is actually pretty intelligent and a little lonely. Frost and another adventure named Adelina Fortnight (Zoe Saldana) team up with Sandy to venture into Shangri-La, a mystical area where his distant relatives may reside.

Click on the media bar to hear Jackman talk about his love for Laika Studios and stop motion animation:

Missing Link opens nationwide April 12.

Find Us On Facebook: Hollywood Outbreak
Follow Us On Twitter: @Hollyoutbreak
Posted by: Greg Srisavasdi

CinemAddicts Podcast Spotlights Geoffrey Rush Family Drama ‘Storm Boy’

This week’s biggest releases include Shazam! and Pet Sematary, but the great news is that there’s one under the radar flick that, while appealing to the whole family, is also a refreshingly uncompromising story.

Storm Boy centers on Michael Kingley (Geoffrey Rush), a retired businessman who is about to sign off on a high profit deal that could be disruptive to the environment. The meat of the narrative centers on Kingley’s youth (Finn Little plays the younger version). For a brief spell Kingley raised three orphaned pelicans with the help of his dad (Jai Courtney) and a close friend (David Gulpilil, best known for his work in the seminal feature Walkabout). As Kingley relates this childhood story to his granddaughter (Morgana Davies), he ultimately realizes that the past really never left him.

Storm Boy is just one of the films that are covered on this month’s episode of CinemAddicts, as we also discuss Kent Jones’ excellent directing debut Diane and the latest Mel Gibson feature Dragged Across Concrete. Take a listen below to the latest installment of CinemAddicts and tell us what you think!

Storm Boy hits theaters April 5.

Find Us On Facebook: Hollywood Outbreak
Follow Us On Twitter: @Hollyoutbreak
Posted by: Greg Srisavasdi