hail-caesar-posterThe Coen Brothers were mere tikes during the ’50s era of Hollywood, but that has not kept the directing duo from capturing one of the golden eras of film in their new movie Hail, Caesar The film serves as a love letter to an era gone by, where the actors were true personalities and the movies were grand in scale.

At the center of it all is Eddie Mannix, a rock in the midst of all the chaos played brilliantly by Coen Brothers vet Josh Brolin. Mannix is more fixer than wheeler-dealer, seemingly always coming out ahead no matter what crisis comes his way. The studio’s underwater vixen (Scarlett Johansson) gets herself knocked up out of wedlock, Mannix gets the call. The studio wants to make its countrified cowboy (Alden Ehrenreich) a dramatic leading man, much to the dismay of an acclaimed director (Ralph Fiennes), it’s up to Mannix to make the personalities work. And the biggest issue of Mannix’s harried day comes when the superstar (George Clooney) of the studio’s biggest prestige picture goes missing, kidnapped from the set.

It’s a bunch of drama for Mannix, who also finds himself hounded by twin gossip columnists Thora and Thessaly Thacker (both played by Tilda Swinton), as he attempts to throw them off the scent of his latest woes. It’s not an easy life for Mannix, as we also see him pursued for a job outside of the studio by Lockheed that would seemingly set him up for life but would take him away from the chaotic life where he thrives.

While there is plenty to like about Hail, Caesar, the film feels uneven. Perhaps the biggest issue is the execution. The film appears divided in its desire to be a tribute to old Hollywood and its dedication to telling the story at hand.  Moments where the momentum of the plot picks up are often interrupted by elaborate nods to films of the past — whether it be the beautifully shot underwater ballet featuring Johansson, the Gene Kelly-esque dance number led by Channing Tatum, Ehrenreich’s crooning cowboy bit or even Clooney’s Oscar-worthy speech played for dramatic effect, then laughs in the titular film — it all feels like the obvious salutes to films of eras past get in the way of driving the plot’s advancement.

Ultimately, the aforementioned tributes are some of the most memorable moments of the film, due in part to the excellent work of cinematographer Roger Deakins, but you sort of get the feeling that some of the character development of the secondary players got cut as a result. Mannix is the one character in the film that is fully fleshed out, while most of the other characters are more caricatures. Johansson and Ehrenreich stand out with their limited time onscreen, but the Johansson storyline, in particular, feels forced into a shiny red bow conclusion.

If you’re a Coen Brothers fan, you’ll appreciate the amazing look and feel for the era as well as the humorous banter in some scenes, but as a whole ‘Hail, Caesar’ would likely be ranked in the middle of the pack or lower in their cinematic history.

Find Us On Facebook: Hollywood Outbreak
Follow Us On Twitter: @Hollyoutbreak

Posted by: Ari Coine


Share:
  • Digg
  • Twitter
  • FriendFeed
  • Facebook
  • MySpace
  • del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Live
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Yahoo! Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Sphinn
  • LinkedIn
  • Mixx
  • Suggest to Techmeme via Twitter
  • Technorati
  • email

tigrabella

Marvel Avengers Academy, a just released free to play title available on the App Store and Google Play, has gamers tasked with building and running the Avengers Academy. Under this setting, players will encounter super heroes and villains when they were students developing their superpowers. Through combat training and performing various student centered missions (attending classes, taking part in sports teams, and going on dates), the characters’ various abilities will be upgraded.

One of the game’s biggest draws lies in the talented voice cast that take part in Marvel Avengers Academy. Some of the actors featured in the title include Bella Thorne (Tigra), Kiernan Shipka (Spider-Woman), John Cena (Hulk), Colton Haynes (Thor), Alison Brie (Black Widow), Alexandra Daddario (Wasp), Dave Franco (Iron Man), and Priyanka Chopra (Ms. Marvel).

“Whether you’re voting Cap for class president, fan-girling out with Ms. Marvel, or going on a date with Loki, you’re going to have a blast at Marvel Avengers Academy,” said Marvel Games Creative Director Bill Rosemann. “By embracing everything we all love about Earth’s Mightiest heroes and giving them a fresh spin, we’ve reimagined fan and cult faves alike as powerful and complex young adults with that magic mix of action, drama and romance that is Marvel.”


For more info on Marvel Avengers Academy, check out its official Facebook page.


Find Us On Facebook: Hollywood Outbreak
Follow Us On Twitter: @Hollyoutbreak

Posted By: Greg Srisavasdi



Share:
  • Digg
  • Twitter
  • FriendFeed
  • Facebook
  • MySpace
  • del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Live
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Yahoo! Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Sphinn
  • LinkedIn
  • Mixx
  • Suggest to Techmeme via Twitter
  • Technorati
  • email

lastwitchhunter11

Released this week on Blu-ray and DVD, The Last Witch Hunter features Vin Diesel as Kaulder, an immortal warrior who is making sure the uneasy peace between humans and witches remains. When the Queen Witch (Julie Engelbrecht) returns to obliterate humankind, it’s up to Kaulder to stop her onslaught.

Michael Caine and Elijah Wood also star as Dolan 36th and Dolan 37th, priests who serve the Axe and the Cross, the organization which helps Kaulder’s eternal quest for harmony. Game of Thrones vet Rose Leslie is Chloe, a witch who joins the mission to take down the Queen Witch.

Clocking in at 106 minutes, The Last Witch Hunter has enough action to please fantasy-adventure enthusiasts and Vin Diesel fans. Since most of the narrative deals with Kaulder’s attempts to stop the Queen Witch, the origin story behind Kaulder and the Axe and the Cross was understandably glossed over.

That being said, the universe behind The Last Witch Hunter is detailed in the nine-minute plus animated short “The Origins of the Axe and the Cross.” One of the short’s intriguing ideas was to claim that the Black Death was not a plague, but rather a conflict between humans and witches (with Kaulder spearheading the war). Beautifully animated with a film noir-ish tinge, “The Origins of the Axe” also contains narration from Michael Caine.

Along with the animated short, special features include audio commentary from director Breck Eisner, The Last Witch Hunter Sizzle Reel (which contains a snippet of Ciara’s rendition of “Paint It, Black), and the 30-minute featurette “Crafting the Magic: The Last Witch Hunter.” There’s also two deleted scenes on the disc: “Fear Potion” features a dangerous potion stand-off between witches Chloe (Rose Leslie) and Belial (Ólafur Darri Ólaffson) and “Ellic’s House” which is essentially an extended scene that has Kaulder tracking down Belial.

Find Us On Facebook: Hollywood Outbreak
Follow Us On Twitter: @Hollyoutbreak

Posted By: Greg Srisavasdi


Share:
  • Digg
  • Twitter
  • FriendFeed
  • Facebook
  • MySpace
  • del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Live
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Yahoo! Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Sphinn
  • LinkedIn
  • Mixx
  • Suggest to Techmeme via Twitter
  • Technorati
  • email


DEMO_1SHEET_27x40_MECH_FINAL2_ONLINE.indd Jake Gyllenhaal has starred in a slew of films the past several years (Prisoners, Enemy, Nightcrawler, Southpaw, Everest), and now he’s teamed with Wild director Jean-Marc Vallée with Demolition.

The story centers on Davis Mitchell (Gyllenhaal), an investment banker still reeling over his wife’s death. Initially channeling his frustration by writing a complaint letter to a vending machine company, David pens even more missives that reveal a deeper insight into his life.

Naomi Watts is Karen, a customer service rep who forms an unlikely bond with Davis, and their relationship leads our protagonist on an entirely new adventure. Chris Cooper co-stars as Davis’ father in law, with Judah Lewis playing Karen’s son Chris.

If you want to see Jake Gyllenhaal demolish a home and literally take things apart, then Demolition should be up your alley. Check out the trailer below and tell us what you think!




Demolition opens nationwide April 8, 2016.

Find Us On Facebook: Hollywood Outbreak
Follow Us On Twitter: @Hollyoutbreak

Posted By: Greg Srisavasdi


Share:
  • Digg
  • Twitter
  • FriendFeed
  • Facebook
  • MySpace
  • del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Live
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Yahoo! Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Sphinn
  • LinkedIn
  • Mixx
  • Suggest to Techmeme via Twitter
  • Technorati
  • email

EYE IN THE SKY

Helen Mirren teams with director Gavin Hood (Ender’s Game) in Eye in the Sky, a top notch thriller about a military officer (Mirren) who’s tasked with capturing terrorists in Kenya. The operation is a joint collaboration with UK and American forces, with Colonel Katherine Powell (Helen Mirren) and American pilot Steve Watts (Aaron Paul) leading a potential drone strike that is bound to have collateral damage.

Late actor Alan Rickman co-stars as Lieutenant General Frank Benson, a military vet whose frustration lies in the bureaucratic red tape that’s involved in the drone mission. Even though Benson and Powell are at the top of their respective field, politics and a seemingly endless chain of command handcuffs their latest mission.

Mirren previously worked with Alan Rickman on stage in Antony and Cleopatra, and during the interviews for Eye in the Sky she talked about working with the beloved thespian.

“I think Alan would have been incredibly proud that this is his last movie,” said Mirren. “Because what I love about it is the Alan you see up on the screen is much closer to the real Alan Rickman we all knew and loved.”

Click on the media bar below to hear Helen Mirren talk about Alan Rickman:





Eye in the Sky opens in select theaters March 11.


Find Us On Facebook: Hollywood Outbreak
Follow Us On Twitter: @Hollyoutbreak

Posted By: Greg Srisavasdi


Share:
  • Digg
  • Twitter
  • FriendFeed
  • Facebook
  • MySpace
  • del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Live
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Yahoo! Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Sphinn
  • LinkedIn
  • Mixx
  • Suggest to Techmeme via Twitter
  • Technorati
  • email

cinemaddicts3

Episode five of CinemAddicts is now up on iTunes, and during this week we cover the Coen Brothers comedy Hail, Caesar!, Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, and the thriller Misconduct.

My Blu-ray pick of the week is the taut and inspired thriller The Gift, which marks the directorial debut of Joel Edgerton (he also stars in the film), and Anderson Cowan waxes poetic on animator Don Hertzfeldt’s 2012 feature It’s Such A Beautiful Day.

A collaboration between Hollywood Outbreak and Cold Cockle Productions, CinemAddicts provides listeners with reviews of movies coming out each week. During the podcast’s final segment, I give my DVD or Blu-ray recommendation and Cowan offers up a movie that’s worth catching on Netflix (or other streaming services). Giveaways are also a part of the show, and to enter our weekly contests, please subscribe and review CinemAddicts by clicking here.



Find Us On Facebook: Hollywood Outbreak
Follow Us On Twitter: @Hollyoutbreak

Posted By: Greg Srisavasdi


Share:
  • Digg
  • Twitter
  • FriendFeed
  • Facebook
  • MySpace
  • del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Live
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Yahoo! Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Sphinn
  • LinkedIn
  • Mixx
  • Suggest to Techmeme via Twitter
  • Technorati
  • email

misconduct22With superhero and animated franchises serving as the king of the cinematic kingdom, big budget thrillers have gone the way of the dodo bird, and one would assume an Al Pacino and Anthony Hopkins thriller would have had a much bigger release in the 1990s.

But living in the past can be a bad thing, and thankfully Misconduct features the aforementioned actors along with a solid cast to craft a first rate suspense flick which should keep you on your toes.

Josh Duhamel is Ben Cahill, an ambitious lawyer who will do everything it takes to climb up his firm’s ladder and impress his boss (Al Pacino). Ben’s laser focused career goals is one reason why his marriage to Charlotte (Alice Eve), a dedicated and overworked nurse, is going south.

When Ben’s mentally unstable ex-girlfriend Emily (Malin Akerman) reenters his life (via a Facebook friend request!) and divulges that her billionaire boyfriend Denning (Anthony Hopkins) is running a corrupt pharmaceutical business, Ben sees a multi-million dollar lawsuit in the making.

With dreams of glory and a rich payday right around the corner, Ben can’t see the forest from the trees. Thanks to a dying, motorcycle riding hitman who’s obsessed with truth (Byung-hun Lee) and a series of double crosses, mayhem and murder is now the order of the day, as Ben’s new goal is to simply stay alive.

Director Shintaro Shimosawa references the work of visual master Brian De Palma (Body Double, Dressed To Kill) as an influence for Misconduct, and the film’s greatest asset is Shimosawa’s visually arresting and cerebral approach to setting up a sequence. Most of today’s movies focus on pushing the narrative, relying on coverage and quick cutting to tell their story, and while that aesthetic can oftentimes be effective, the art of frame composition is usually lost in the process. If you love De Palma or Chan-wook Park’s (Stoker) approach to storytelling, then Misconduct should be a compelling watch.

Anthony Hopkins and Al Pacino are well aware they are working within the baroque and operatic universe of a thriller, and they fill their respective monologues with scenery chewing gusto. Though Josh Duhamel seems a bit over matched sparring with these two heavyweights, it actually works, as Ben initially comes off as a pawn in a much bigger chess match. Though Duhamel doesn’t get to paint with as many colors as the film’s supporting players, he does a solid job in anchoring the narrative.

In thrillers, the girlfriend or wife role is usually given short shrift, but highly overlooked actress Alice Eve puts an indelible stamp to the proceedings, delivering the film’s knockout performance. With its stylized flair, Misconduct is an acquired taste that will have its share of detractors. Brian De Palma says that “the camera lies 24 frames per second,” and for many this manipulation equates to highly watchable cinema.  Shintaro Shimosawa understands that, even in today’s moviegoing climate, the thrill of a thriller is never gone, and hopefully Misconduct finds its way to welcoming shores.

Misconduct comes out in limited theatrical release and On Demand February 5, 2016. The movie is also discussed on this week’s CinemAddicts, a movie review podcast which is currently available on iTunes.




Find Us On Facebook: Hollywood Outbreak
Follow Us On Twitter: @Hollyoutbreak

Posted By: Greg Srisavasdi


Share:
  • Digg
  • Twitter
  • FriendFeed
  • Facebook
  • MySpace
  • del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Live
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Yahoo! Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Sphinn
  • LinkedIn
  • Mixx
  • Suggest to Techmeme via Twitter
  • Technorati
  • email

caesar2

George Clooney reunites with directors Joel and Ethan Coen for the Hail, Caesar!, a comedy which features him as an A-list star who’s been kidnapped during production of a studio’s latest swords and sandals epic. Josh Brolin is Eddie Mannix, the studio fixer tasked with finding the missing star.

The film is set during Hollywood’s Golden Age, and as for modern times Tinseltown is undergoing a deeper look at diversity issues. For Clooney, taking a closer look at the entertainment industry’s representation of minorities can only be a good thing.

“I think that needs to be examined for a multitude of reasons,” said Clooney. “But I do believe it’s going to get a very good look at now and I think that’s always good. I think anytime you open up any part of an industry to diversity, I’ve never not seen not be good. So I think it’s a good thing.”

Click on the media to hear Clooney talk about the Academy’s decision to, in their own words, “alter the makeup of our membership.”



Hail, Caesar! opens nationwide Friday.

Find Us On Facebook: Hollywood Outbreak
Follow Us On Twitter: @Hollyoutbreak

Posted By: Greg Srisavasdi


Share:
  • Digg
  • Twitter
  • FriendFeed
  • Facebook
  • MySpace
  • del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Live
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Yahoo! Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Sphinn
  • LinkedIn
  • Mixx
  • Suggest to Techmeme via Twitter
  • Technorati
  • email

bates99

Season four of the critically acclaimed A&E Network series Bates Motel returns March 7, as the inextricable bond between Norma Bates (Vera Farmiga) and her son Norman (Freddie Highmore) is explored for another ten episodes.

Along with paying homage to the twist driven dynamic and scares that infused Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho, Bates Motel has also carved out an identity of its own, proving that Norman Bates’ life before he crossed paths with Marion Crane (Janet Leigh) makes for arresting viewing.

While this season will continue to spotlight Norman Bates’ further journey into darkness, cast members Freddie Highmore and Nestor Carbonell are also expanding their creative horizons (Highmore is writing on the show and Carbonnell will also direct this season).

A promo for the upcoming season features a not so subtle (but awesome) homage to Psycho and offers a not so uplifting tagline (”We all go a little mad sometimes”). Check out the video below and tell us if you’re excited for season four of Bates Motel!





Find Us On Facebook: Hollywood Outbreak
Follow Us On Twitter: @Hollyoutbreak

Posted By: Greg Srisavasdi


Share:
  • Digg
  • Twitter
  • FriendFeed
  • Facebook
  • MySpace
  • del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Live
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Yahoo! Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Sphinn
  • LinkedIn
  • Mixx
  • Suggest to Techmeme via Twitter
  • Technorati
  • email


heart88

In The Heart Of The Sea, an adventure which reunites Rush director Ron Howard with Chris Hemsworth, hits Blu-ray and DVD March 8 via Warner Bros. Home Entertainment.

Set in 1820, the narrative centers on a whale’s attack on the Essex, a New England whaling ship that’s being led by an inexperienced Captain (Benjamin Walker). Hemsworth is Owen Chase, the vessel’s veteran first mate who takes charge when things go south, and Ben Whishaw plays novelist Herman Melville (the events inspired Melville’s classic novel Moby Dick). The picture, which is based on Nathaniel Philbrick’s book, In The Heart Of The Sea: The Tragedy Of The Whaleship Essex, hits Digital HD February 23.

The Blu-ray disc comes with deleted and extended scenes and the following featurettes: “Whale Tales: Melville’s Untold Story,” The Hard Life of a Whaler,” “Chase & Pollard: A Man of Means and A Man of Courage,” “Lightning Strikes Twice: The Real-Life Sequel to Moby Dick,” “Commanding The Heart of the Sea,” and “Ron Howard: Captain’s Log.” The DVD version’s sole special feature is “Chase & Pollard: A Man of Means and A Man of Courage.”


Find Us On Facebook: Hollywood Outbreak
Follow Us On Twitter: @Hollyoutbreak

Posted By: Greg Srisavasdi


Share:
  • Digg
  • Twitter
  • FriendFeed
  • Facebook
  • MySpace
  • del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Live
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Yahoo! Bookmarks
  • Reddit
  • Sphinn
  • LinkedIn
  • Mixx
  • Suggest to Techmeme via Twitter
  • Technorati
  • email